Tuesday, November 4, 2008

PROVE TO ME I DON'T HAVE OVARIAN CANCER

In remembrance of my Mom, (Dorothy Hodgens) who died of Ovarian Cancer in July 2007 and in honor of my new friend at Shoal Creek Cottage, who has defeated the monster.

from her blog. www.shoalcreekcottage.blogspot.com/

If any of these symptoms are unusual for you, can not be explained by existing medical conditions, and persist for more than two weeks, please be sure to bring this to the attention of a physician. INSIST ON BEING TESTED FOR IT. SIMPLE BLOOD TEST!

1.Vague but persistent and unexplained gastrointestinal complaints such as gas, nausea, and indigestion
2.Abdominal bloating, pelvic and/or abdominal pain, and/or feeling of fullness
3.Unexplained change in bowel habits (constipation or diarrhea)
4.Unexplained weight gain or loss
5.Frequency and/or urgency of urination
6.Unusual fatigue
7.Shortness of breath
8.New and unexplained abnormal postmenopausal vaginal bleedingOvarian Cancer:

The FactsCurrently, there is no accurate test for ovarian cancer. The most effective way women can protect themselves against ovarian cancer is to learn the signs and symptoms. If these symptoms are unusual for you and persist, see a health care professional to rule out the possibility of ovarian cancer.

I miss you Momma!

Melinda

3 comments:

Debra Facer said...

Melinda, thank you so much for the sweet comments on my blog, I am so sorry for your loss, I lost my mom four years ago this month to lung cancer and I know the pain that you feel, thanks for helping spread the word.. Big hugs Deb

Feener said...

very important post

5PjVNtduuu3oGhlmpOEwfoiCbOV_uZ76 said...

Academy Award Winning Actress Kathy Bates Opens Up to OCNA about her Experience with Ovarian Cancer

A few weeks ago, the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance (OCNA) had the opportunity to sit down with Academy Award winning actress Kathy Bates to listen as she told the tale -- for the first time publicly -- of her personal fight with ovarian cancer. The interview was very personal and in-depth and shares insights about how she was diagnosed with the disease. Additionally, Ms. Bates filmed a 30-second TV Public Service Announcement (PSA) about ovarian cancer and its symptoms, which launched in NYC Taxi Cabs during September, National Ovarian Cancer Awareness month, and is running on TV networks nationwide.

“OCNA recognizes the personal strength it took Kathy to talk publicly about her run-in with cancer,” says Karen Orloff Kaplan, Chief Executive Officer of OCNA. “We appreciate her willingness to share her story and be an advocate for the organization in its mission to educate women across the country about ovarian cancer.”

To view the OCNA Kathy Bates 5-minute interview clip and 30-second TV PSA, visit http://www.youtube.com/user/ovariancancerorg

“As an ovarian cancer survivor, I have decided to join forces with the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance by sharing my story and helping educate women about one of the deadliest cancers affecting women today.” -- Kathy Bates

Raising awareness about ovarian cancer on a national and local level is essential because diagnosing the disease is difficult. The number of women diagnosed with ovarian cancer in its early stages is so small that the survival rates continue to be low. In more than 30 years since the War on Cancer was declared, ovarian cancer mortality rates have not significantly improved. About 22,000 American women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2008 and about 15,000 women will die from the disease.

If interested in learning more about the Kathy Bates interview and PSA or would like copies to share with your community, please contact Faryl Greller, Director of Communications & Marketing, at OCNA by phone at 202.331.1332, ext. 307 or email at fgreller@ovariancancer.org.